Hi, my name is Rod Grondin and welcome to my photography website. I am a lifestyle photographer who absolutely loves his job and everything that comes with it.
I appreciate the people I meet, the places I go, the hours I keep, and the spontaneity in every shoot.

I appreciate the reality of everyday life, the fleeting beauty of those in-between moments, and I do my very best to take every picture with that in mind. I want my viewers to relate to my photographs through recognition of and familiarity with the situation.

I grew up in southern New Hampshire and it’s still my home. After college and graduate school, I was a music educator in a southern Maine school system for thirty-five years and held the position of Director of Fine Arts the last nine years before retirement.

As a young child, I watched my father with fascination as he would photograph family events and holiday gatherings. He would spend hours in postproduction water coloring his black and white prints.

In high school, I acquired my first camera; a 35mm viewfinder Kodak. I soon became proficient enough to become the photographer for the high school magazine published twice yearly.

In college, I continued to enjoy photography, photographing landscapes with my trusty Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex camera. I shot both black and white film, which I learned to develop myself, and color film.

During my teaching years, my “sidekick” was my Nikon F100 film camera. I didn’t leave home without it. On weekends, my wife, Nancy, and I would explore the scenic views of the lakes, mountain and seashores of New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine.

I believe that we tend to photograph subjects. This subject and that subject demand our attention. We tend to point our cameras at “things”. And then I realized the space around something can be as interesting as the thing itself.

I realized from teaching music, that the dramatic pauses which build anticipation contribute as much to the atmosphere of a piece of music as the notes played. There’s even a name for it. It’s called a “fermata”. In Italian it’s called a “corona”. A pause, a breath, a moment of reflection leading to anticipation before the pinnacle. I tend to photograph visual coronas.

With over 15 years’ experience, I fulfill my clients’ expectations by combining a natural intuition and keen eye to create the substance of a picture. For me, the creative process is a journey from an inspired idea to the creation of raw picture material to detailed refining work in post-production.

My range is substantial, covering northern New England still life, landscapes and the seashore, as well as portraits, school photography and photojournalism. I am equally at ease working on individual assignments as well as with larger assignments.